Weight Loss

For years we have been taught that the food pyramid is the end all when it comes to proper nutrition. Is there still any merit to the food pyramid today?

I’m sure you all remember learning about proper nutrition in high school…and the Food Pyramid was a vital part of that education.  Have you ever wondered where that came from? The food pyramid was first published in Sweden in 1972 but there were only three levels on this first version and it led to some confusion.  The “newer” pyramid (or Westernized version) was introduced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 1992 and was called the “Food Guide Pyramid”. It had more sections (six this time) that made it easy to understand what amounts of certain foods to eat daily.  These six levels broke down as follows:

 

Grains (bread, cereal, rice, pasta, etc.) Group:  6 – 11 servings daily

Vegetable Group:  2 – 4 servings daily

Fruit Group:  2 – 4 servings daily

Dairy Group:  2 – 3 servings daily

Proteins (meat, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts, etc.) Group:  2 – 3 servings daily

Fats, Oils, and Sweets Group:  use sparingly

This 1992 pyramid emphasized the importance of eating balanced, varied meals by showing the food groups in a way so as to keep proper categories and inform people about the number of servings to have each day.  There were several problems with this version however which included…no one knew what a proper “serving” amount was, healthy fats were lumped in with unhealthy ones, and this version was heavy on carbohydrates (grains) which isn’t the healthiest way to eat for a variety of reasons.  There was also interference in this pyramid’s creation by the major food industry groups who, of course, wanted higher profits by promoting more consumption of their products.

The pyramid was updated in 2005 to show a better understanding of reducing the carbs/starches section and including some healthy fats but it was still essentially the same old pyramid with minor clarifications.  There was a newer and better way to arrange your diet just a few years away.

In 2011 a completely new arrangement came about…”My Plate”!  This replaced the “pyramid” visual of days gone by showing how to arrange each meal better on your plate with a proper proportion of food groups:  Vegetables, Healthy Protein, Whole Grains, Fruits, Dairy, and minimal healthy fats. Vegetables & Fruits are to be about half of the plate with Whole Grains and Healthy Protein are each one quarter.No version of the pyramid or plate can take the place of proper eating nor can it be adequately displayed in a graphic that everyone will comprehend…but seeing how to proportion food on a plate is a good visual to start with.  Everyone has dietary likes and dislikes, caloric requirements, as well as possibly having some restrictions, but learning how to eat properly and counting calories is vital to a healthy body. This is just a way to hopefully help you start to understand proper nutrition and to get you thinking about your relationship with food and health.  As always, please check with your doctor before making any major dietary changes to make sure they’re appropriate for your personal health situation.

 

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So where exactly did the idea of a 2000 calorie diet come from? We’re discussing its origin and merits on the blog today.

Have you ever wondered why the FDA uses a 2000 calorie per day standard as the basis for a healthy amount of calories and where that number came from?  If so, then you’re in the minority because many people just accept this number as what they should be eating without even questioning if it’s right for them.  Hopefully, I can shed some light on things and possibly give you some information to fine-tune your diet for better health.

2000 Calorie Diet

The 2000 calorie per day standard came about in 1990 when the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) mandated that a caloric reference is included on the nutritional labels of packaged foods.  This turned into The Nutrition and Labeling Act and it was designed to standardize food labeling that previously had been at the discretion of manufacturers and individual states. The new Act meant that manufacturers had to list information like ingredients, calories, serving sizes, fat and sodium content as well as carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals in reference to the “daily values”, which are the maximum amounts of recommended intake per day.  Prior to this Act, there wasn’t a standard caloric intake so the daily values were difficult to determine.

The FDA knew that caloric needs to be varied by gender, age, and activity level and they also knew they needed some sort of standard number to put on the label.  So the FDA looked to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) food consumption surveys, which reported caloric intake for men, women, and children. The surveys showed the following in regards to the average range of calories each category consumed per day:

Men:  2,000 – 3,000 cal./day Women:  1,600 – 2,200 cal./day     Children:  1,800 – 2,500 cal./day

To simplify the food labels the FDA suggested using a single amount on all labels:  2,350 calories per day (an average of all three categories). After some further research, arguments, and compromise the FDA concluded that the simplified number of 2,000 calories per day would be best as a reference for labeling as well as dietary requirements.  This nice, round number was a more effective tool for educational purposes, for reading labels, and understanding dietary requirements.

The FDA knew that some people would need fewer calories and some would need more for various reasons, but the 2000 calories per day was the best compromise to give away for manufacturers to provide the necessary nutritional information while still allowing for an adjustable reference.  How many calories you might need daily depends on several factors including age, height, gender, goal (weight gain, loss, or maintenance), medical conditions, etc. and there are many calculators online for finding the right amount for you specifically. Here is a good example of an easy Calorie Calculator you can use for reference:  http://www.calculator.net/calorie-calculator.html

For example, an average woman needs to eat about 2,000 calories daily to maintain her weight, and 1,500 calories to lose one pound of weight per week. An average man needs 2,500 calories daily to maintain his weight, and 2,000 to lose one pound of weight per week. However, this depends on numerous factors…as well as what foods a person can and can’t eat based on medical conditions (Diabetes, Celiac, etc.) and medications (some have dietary restrictions).  As always, please consult your doctor and pharmacist whenever you embark on a new dietary journey for specific things you need to consider for your personal situation and any medications you’re taking. It’s worth looking into what your actual caloric needs are daily to give you a reference to make any changes you feel are necessary.

 

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The Ketogenic Diet trend seems to be taking off, But before you try it, there are many things to consider to help you decide if the Ketogenic Diet is actually right for you.

The ketogenic diet (or keto diet) is a low carbohydrate, moderate protein, a high-fat diet that forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates for fuel which puts the body into a metabolic state known as ketosis.  When in ketosis (fat burning mode) the liver produces ketones which become the main energy source for the body and this all revolves around the consumption of fat. This is based on the premise that your body was designed to run more efficiently as a fat burner rather than a sugar burner.

Ketogenic

When you eat something high in carbs (donuts, rice, bread, etc.), your body will produce glucose and insulin.

  • Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that is why it’s the preferred energy source for your body.
  • Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by transporting it around your body.

The problem is that when glucose is used as a primary energy source fats are not needed for energy and are stored instead.  Also, the body can’t store that much glucose and the extra glucose gets converted into fat which is then also stored. However, since glucose is the primary energy source when it’s turned to fat and then stored it doesn’t get used.  Instead, when the body needs more glucose for energy it signals the brain and you end up reaching for a quick shack of sugar, chips, etc. instead of burning the fat that is being stored.

So, this crazy cycle keeps going round & round until you’re carrying extra pounds and quite possibly addicted to sugar.  This is where the keto diet can help you become a fat burner instead of a sugar burner by training your body to stop relying on glucose and to start relying on fats.  This is the end goal of the keto diet but you don’t enter ketosis (fat burning mode) by starving your body…you enter ketosis by starving your body of carbohydrates and sugars.

You’ve most likely heard that we can go weeks without food but only a couple of days without water.  The reason for this is ketosis and most people have enough fat stored to fuel their body for a while.  This is great in a survival situation but terrible in everyday life. In ketosis the body produces ketones.  Ketones occur from the breakdown of fat in the liver, hence the importance of consuming enough fat daily. When you lower your carb intake, glucose levels along with blood sugar levels drop which in turn lowers insulin levels as fat cells release their stored water and then they’re able to enter the bloodstream and head to the liver.

The benefits of the ketogenic diet are many:

  1. Weight loss
  2. Better blood sugar control
  3. Improved insulin resistance
  4. Better focus
  5. Increased energy
  6. Better appetite control
  7. Improved Cholesterol & blood pressure
  8. Clearer skin

Here is a brief idea of what foods to eat for the keto diet and what to avoid:

Foods to Eat

  • Meats – fish, beef, lamb, poultry, eggs
  • Leafy greens – spinach, kale
  • Above ground vegetables – broccoli, cauliflower
  • High-fat dairy – hard cheeses,  high fat cream, and butter
  • Sweeteners – stevia, erythritol, monk fruit, and other low-carb sweeteners
  • Other fats – coconut oil, high-fat dressing, saturated fats, etc.
  • Nuts & seeds – macadamia nuts, walnuts, sunflower seeds
  • Avocado & berries – raspberries, blackberries, and other low glycemic berries

Foods to Avoid

  • Grains – wheat, corn, rice, and cereal
  • Sugar – honey, agave, and maple syrup
  • Fruit – apples, bananas, and oranges
  • Tubers – potatoes, and yams
  • Legumes

The general ratio of the keto diet is 70% fats, 25% protein, and 5% carbohydrates.  This means you’re getting your fuel from fats and you should start seeing the benefits of the keto diet in no time.  As always, check with your doctor if you have certain conditions before starting on the ketogenic diet. There are many resources for keto diet foods, shopping lists, recipes, charts, etc. online and just as many books available for you to review for details to start your journey.  Good luck and happy eating!

 

 

 

 

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It happens, we go on vacation, we overindulge on the weekend, and getting your diet back on track can be a slippery slope! Here are some terrific ways to get back on track quickly!

It happens to all of us at one time or another.  You do so well for so long on whatever diet plan you’re following and then something happens to throw a wrench in the works.  Be it a celebration, overwhelming temptation, or just boredom, we all have those moments when we throw discipline out the window and give in to that favorite comfort food that’s been calling our name.  This isn’t unusual, and in fact, it’s quite normal…the key is to not beat yourself up over a minor “flub-up” and to get your diet back on track right away! 

 

Here are some of the most common reasons we cheat on diets…try to be aware so as to better avoid them:

 

  • Not Eating Enough:  eating too little and going too long between meals causes dips in blood sugar and can lead to cravings & binges; plus deprivation causes the body to “hoard” calories when you do eat, slows your metabolism, and undermines weight loss.
  • You Want a Quick Fix:  there is no quick and easy way to drop pounds so expecting to lose weight faster than you gained it is an unrealistic expectation leading to failure; think instead about making healthier food choices and incorporating exercise into daily life to make health the goal and the rewards will come naturally.
  • Temptation by Family & Friends:  make it clear to family and friends that you’re committed to living a healthier lifestyle and while that means necessary changes you will still spend time with them and even eat out when the occasion calls for it; maybe even ask them to join you in your endeavors.
  • Skimping on Sleep:  new studies show that not getting enough rest can actually cause you to gain weight, as researchers suspect that a lack of sleep negatively affects metabolism; be disciplined about getting eight hours…sleep isn’t a luxury it’s a necessity for good health.
  • Calories Count…Portion Control:  calories are fuel for the body, plain and simple…so even a healthy food item is still one that contains calories and the size of the portion you’re eating needs to be monitored; be aware of what calories are in the foods you choose and also exercise caution with the portion size…extra calories turn to fat.

 

Creative Bioscience has plenty of products to help with appetite control, increasing your metabolism, detoxing your liver, and balancing your overall gut health.  You can read all about these products on our website www.creativebioscience.com  and see what each product is intended to do as well as the benefits of the product ingredients.  No product can do it all for you, eating healthy and getting exercise are the keys to not only weight loss but good health.  Supplements can help you with your efforts but they can’t do nearly as much as you have the power to do yourself. Remember to never let a stumble in the road, be the end of the journey.

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There is much talk about healthy bacteria these days. Here is how probiotics are helping people improve their overall health and benefit from losing weight.

Written By:  Michelle White

There is a lot of talk these days about “healthy bacteria” in your digestive tract…but what exactly does that mean? It’s more than just keeping you from bloating, heartburn, or a mad dash to the bathroom. A healthy gut is crucial to your overall health and is connected to all that happens in your body, especially your immune system.  A healthy cut can be accomplished by introducing probiotics into your everyday diet.

With nearly 75% of your immune tissue located within your digestive system, it’s crucial to keep things in proper balance. Many people are realizing that eating the wrong types of food can have a negative effect on the bacteria in your digestive tract and make you more susceptible to illness and a wide range of diseases.

It’s nearly impossible to eat your way to a healthy level of good bacteria…but if you would like to try here are a few great probiotic foods: \

  • Kefir
  • Sauerkraut
  • Kimchi
  • Kombucha
  • Yogurt
  • Raw Cheeses (goat cheese, etc.)
  • Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Salted Gherkin Pickles
  • Brine-Cured Olives
  • Tempeh (fermented soybeans)
  • Miso (fermented soybean, barley or brown rice with koji).

If none of these are to your liking then supplementation is the answer.

Our Probiotic Formula is made especially for those of you who don’t want to eat your way to good digestive health. With two billion colony forming units (CFU) of the top four strains of beneficial bacteria (totaling eight billion CFU’s) along with two beneficial prebiotics (the “food” the good bacteria feeds on to multiply) our Probiotic Formula provides you with a great way to start optimizing your health.

Most importantly, better digestion and gut health can provide you with not only a better functioning immune system but a leg-up in your weight loss efforts. Probiotic Formula is part of nearly all of our special bundle offers for this very reason…when your body functions properly it can do amazing things!

Learn more about our Probiotic Formula

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Adding juices to your diet is an easy way to get more vitamins and minerals without too many calories. Cold press juice is said to be one of the healthiest options. Keep Reading

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Before I found 30Night Diet (5-HTP), it seemed that I was doing a lot of stress eating. It was never something that I did as a kid, but as an adult, I had developed a really bad habit. Keep Reading

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Not just child’s play, trampoline classes are popping up in gyms across the country. Trampoline workouts are not only a quick way to tighten, tone, and build core strength, they can also shred calories and boost cardio as effectively as going for a run, but without the stress on your joints! Keep Reading

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Frozen yogurt shops are popping up all over!  But, is frozen yogurt actually better for you than ice cream?  It depends; some premium brands of ice cream contain 3 times more calories and 5 times more fat than frozen yogurt!  But, some frozen yogurt can still stacks up equally to ice cream when you look at sugar content.  One of the healthiest routes may be to make your own homemade frozen yogurt. Keep Reading

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The Dumbbell Workout

by Jackie on February 1, 2013

Most people have a set of dumbbells lying around their house.  Why not brush them off and try this full-body at home workout?  All you need is a pair of 5-8 pound dumbbells!  These compound exercises work multiple muscle groups with each move so you get more bang for your workout buck!  Plus you get a cardio workout while increasing strength, all this in only 15-20 minutes! Keep Reading

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